Jewellery

Imitation accessories Hair

In our way, Johnson strongly expressed his love of driving fast in a post-chaise. \’If (said he,) I had no duties, and no reference to futurity, I would spend my life in driving briskly in a post-chaise with a pretty woman; but she should be one who could understand me, and would add something to the conversation.\’ I observed, that we were this day to stop just where the Highland army did in 1745. JOHNSON. \’It was a noble attempt.\’ BOSWELL. \’I wish we could have an authentick history of it.\’ JOHNSON. \’If you were not an idle dog you might write it, by collecting from every body what they can tell, and putting down your authorities.\’ BOSWELL. \’But I could not have the advantage of it in my life-time.\’ JOHNSON. \’You might have the satisfaction of its fame, by printing it in Holland; and as to profit, consider how long it was before writing came to be considered in a pecuniary view. Baretti says, he is the first man that ever received copy-money in Italy.\’ I said that I would endeavour to do what Dr. Johnson suggested and I thought that I might write so as to venture to publish my History of the Civil War in Great-Britain in 1745 and 1746, without being obliged to go to a foreign press.

When we arrived at Derby, Dr. Butter accompanied us to see the manufactory of china there. I admired the ingenuity and delicate art with which a man fashioned clay into a cup, a saucer, or a tea-pot, while a boy turned round a wheel to give the mass rotundity. I thought this as excellent in its species of power, as making good verses in ITS species. Yet I had no respect for this potter. Neither, indeed, has a man of any extent of thinking for a mere verse-maker, in whose numbers, however perfect, there is no poetry, no mind. The china was beautiful, but Dr. Johnson justly observed it was too dear; for that he could have vessels of silver, of the same size, as cheap as what were here made of porcelain.

I felt a pleasure in walking about Derby such as I always have in walking about any town to which I am not accustomed. There is an immediate sensation of novelty; and one speculates on the way in which life is passed in it, which, although there is a sameness every where upon the whole, is yet minutely diversified. The minute diversities in every thing are wonderful. Talking of shaving the other night at Dr. Taylor\’s, Dr. Johnson said, \’Sir, of a thousand shavers, two do not shave so much alike as not to be distinguished.\’ I thought this not possible, till he specified so many of the varieties in shaving;–holding the razor more or less perpendicular;–drawing long or short strokes;–beginning at the upper part of the face, or the under;–at the right side or the left side. Indeed, when one considers what variety of sounds can be uttered by the windpipe, in the compass of a very small aperture, we may be convinced how many degrees of difference there may be in the application of a razor.

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